shoes

Shoes and fruit - Len's Story

factory

In 1938 I worked at a furniture factory in Roseneath St, Clifton Hill. Fellows by the name of Patterson and Didier. There was a shoe factory nearby and, on 2 September 1938, pay day, there was a hold up and the owner got shot. Some of the bullets landed in the embankment on Roseneath St.

Albert Moody had a fruit shop in Hoddle St. I used to supply him with fruit and veggies, and cart stuff out to his little market for him. He was a cripple, he was on crutches, he was a lovely man to deal with.

Hoddle St was widened in 1971. Around that time I bought the top floor of the Julius Marlow shoe factory, opposite the Collingwood Town Hall. It was 60-foot one way and just on 50-foot the other. I was doing wholesale fruit and veggie and eggs and flour at the Vic Market and the Footscray Market.

A thriving strip - Anonymous' Story

closedshop

In the 1950s, before the ‘slum’ demolitions began to widen it, Hoddle Street in Collingwood was a thriving shopping strip much like Smith Street is now. The original street ran between today’s median strip and the Abbotsford side footpath. There were pie shops, green grocers and grocers, butcher shops, a cinema and dance halls. And between Victoria Parade and Alexander Parade there were no less than five hotels. After a days work in the shoe factory Bryce & Duncan, women would often buy the ingredients for their families’ evening meal – then they'd shell the peas in each others company on the train ride home.

The Punt Road bus met with the double decker bus in Johnston Street. Many factories, mainly footwear and clothing, were in the suburb, and lots of workers cottages lined the streets. Many of the people living in the workers cottages were subsequently relocated into the public housing estate between Hoddle and Wellington Streets.

A truck full of fox terriers - Robert's Story

foxterrier

I grew up in Clifton Hill, a fancy name for the northern end of Collingwood; a desirable address in the 21st century but pretty much a low grade suburb in the 1940s despite the glories of the local football club.

Our house was at 372 Hoddle Street, which was, and still is, the major north-south artery of Melbourne. My parents rented the front half of the place from a Mrs Phillips, a vile tempered witch who lived in the rear half. There was a Mr Phillips, I vaguely remember him as a harmless old bloke who was forced to live in a small shed in his own backyard until he drowned himself in the Yarra River, which was only a few hundred metres from Hoddle Street. They found his shoes on the bank. Why do people take their shoes off to suicide?

Despite the proximity of the landlady, the house was quite pleasant and spacious and had an elegant front bay window opening onto a shady timber verandah and a small front garden. Small may be an understatement as I can remember mum cutting the lawn with hand shears.

I doubt if there is still a private residence on Hoddle St now but back then it was a mix of factories, freestanding houses and rows of single story terraces as were next to our place.
I don’t recall feeling hemmed in by our surroundings but, thinking about it now, it must have been frantic for the time. A bus service ran on Hoddle Street connecting Northcote to Elwood in the south. And the Princess Bridge train service to both Hurstbridge and Thomastown ran along the back fence. Maybe this was the reason Mr Phillips ended it all rather than the popular theory of escaping his wife!

My earliest memory is of my mother reading the riot act to the driver of a horse and dray for hitting the horse. In the forties it was still common to see garbage collectors, bakers, milkmen, junk merchants and tradesmen using this sort of transport.

Shoe factories were the main source of employment in both Collingwood and Fitzroy and my father and all of his six brothers worked in the shoe trade. Clicker, maker, finisher, stuffcutter were some of the recognised trades and the smell of the leather and glue at Henri Vanel, where my father was a pattern cutter and clicker, are still easy to bring back to my memory.

As well as shoe factories next door and over the road, we had a wool warehouse and a huge paper storage depot within a hundred metres of the house.

There was a specialist rat-catcher who would arrive on a regular basis with his truck full of fox terriers. These were unleashed at the woolworks or the paper plant and the place would explode into a killing field for an hour or so.

Sounds terribly industrial but, in fact, Alexander Parade, which is now a feeder to the Eastern Freeway, was then a very wide boulevard with a centre garden area running all the way from Carlton to the river at Collingwood. I can remember the trenches that had been dug into the lawns during the Second World War were still there in 1947. Apparently, in my father’s youth, Alexander Parade had been named Riley Street and what was the park with peppercorn trees in my childhood had been an open ditch drain (with the accompanying dead dogs and rubbish). Old-timers still called the garden the Riley Street drain.

Also on this major thoroughfare were the landmark Fitzroy gasometers and the red brick shot tower. The gasometers are gone but the shot tower’s still there. The tallest remaining shot tower in the world according to recent articles! In the days of low rise buildings, these two high rise structures were spectacular. 

The Darling Gardens were a short way up Hoddle Street and were where I spent most of my childhood leisure time playing on the the cannons, climbing trees or driving a billy cart. As well, it was my route to school. Fond memories of a place that now has the shadow of the Hoddle Street massacre hanging over it.

Like my parents, all of my relatives rented houses in the Collingwood or Fitzroy areas. The figure that comes to mind as weekly rental is seventeen shillings ($1.70) on houses that are now selling in excess of $1,000,000. Gentrification!

Image courtesy of the State Library Victoria: www.slv.vic.gov.au
Date(s): [ca.1900 - ca.1927]
Creator: Bane, Joseph 188--1927, photographer.
Copyright status: This work is out of copyright.

Route 246 - Andrea's Story

bus

I am a 53-year-old women who has been travelling Punt Road since I was 18. I used to lived in a flat on Punt Road – with the screeching of the brakes a nightly occurrence and the Nylex clock my own personal clock. I lived in Abbotsford and caught the 246 bus when I studied at Swinburne in the 80s. I lived in Richmond and travelled to Swinburne to work, again, on the 246.

For many years my son travelled to school on the 246 along Punt Road. First with his loving mum then ignoring her to hang with his mates.

My best friend lived in Elsternwick and, when I again lived in Abbotsford, I travelled between our two homes again on the 246 (she passed away almost two years ago). Sometimes it would take two hours, sometimes 20 minutes.

I now live in Westgarth and still work at Swinburne/NICA and still travel on the 246. I have an amazing array of 'shoe shots' of my feet up in the bus as I yet again journey down Punt Road. A girl has to occupy her time whilst the footy traffic clears and I do love shoes! You see I don't drive, and have never driven, so Punt Road is my walking route. My bus route. My taxi route. And many times I sit in other's cars as we crawl along the road that has become an artery of my life. Punt Road is truly my road!

Walk a mile in your shoes - Ernest's Story

shoemaker

My connection with Punt Rd (Hoddle St) was as a newcomer from the U.K. in 1968. New-made friends advised me that, if I needed new good quality shoes, I should go to Punt Road, to a small workshop just opposite Yarra Park. Down a short laneway was Rylan Shoes, shoe and boot makers.

There you could see two or three workers at different stages making shoes by hand. You then selected which shoes you liked. If needed, you left your order and would be advised by phone when the order was ready. My last pair are still being used as gardening shoes.
 
Another memory is driving the length of this road with a caravan, grumbling about the traffic all the way, to get away on our yearly holidays. This was during the early 1980s.

Image courtesy of the State Library Victoria: www.slv.vic.gov.au
Date(s): [1950]
Creator: Sievers, Wolfgang, 1913-2007 photographer.
Copyright status: This work is out of copyright; No copyright restrictions apply.